I love having this thing right side up!

Things go so much faster when you can work on multiple projects as others dry, cure or require other tools. I have been working 8+ hrs a day, which is a luxury. Today I flaked out and only worked 7, but thats not such a bad deal.

Please enjoy this blurry picture while I think of something witty to say:

Firstly, the bow seating area needed the footwell sides glued up. Its a matter of finding the right project for the right tools at hand. I had the drill out, I had epoxy and woodflour from other stuff I had worked on, so off we went. They needed a bit of fitting as I didn’t get the B frame quite as vertical as I should have.

For context, here is her ever-so-sexy caboose:

Per the manual, the sole needed to go in before anything else happens. The epoxy is curing very fast as of late (its been near 90 today), which makes projects go fast. Jacques wants a clamp glued around the entire perimeter for support of the sole, so that was a daunting task. It turns out that I had enough scrap mahogany from other boat projects that I could glue up everything I needed with Phillipine (bastard) mahogany. The sole is butt blocked together to make a solid piece, which I used more 9mm ply at 4″ in width.

Here is a shot of the clamps glued in place and precoated with unthickened epoxy:

Panel numero uno in place (which takes a bit of acrobatics to get it down level without messing up the epoxy):

The final placement, complete with a little weight to get a good smoosh of epoxy:

Okay, I like my wife.

I don’t work on the boat over the weekends typically. Its strictly an 8-5 M-F program when shes at work and Im at home. Unless The Thumb calls me to go fish, then it slows me down a bit.

This week and next, shes working on a big ad campaign which is causing her to work weekend days. Why not capitalize since we are so far behind the Dougster-named “Liveline”. Might as well get some projects done, and a step closer to the finish line!

Big news this visit is the fuel tank arrived. I am having some issues figuring out plumbing routing as the space provided by the designer does not allow for the fuel tubing to come up as a normal boat would. This is going to take some fabricating or some modifying, not sure which yet. But the good news, its here.

For those on the various boat forums, this is the picture I promised of the clamps.

Department of Homeland Security (DHS) clamps:

Well using that name is going to get me on some wierd terror watch list or something Im sure, with Dick Cheney listening in to my phone conversations and such.

I found that I prefer masking tape to the DHS clamps. For some reason it sticks more reliably. Who knew.

This is the framing for the forward seat tops. Lotsa pieces in there. I didn’t want to drill through my faired hull, so I cut my cleats (1″x1″ phillipine mahogany) into 8″ lengths to glue more easily and make the curves without some insane clamping method.

Masking tape version:

I keep working and working and working….

The job never seems finished, but I had a strange revelation while I was doing this work, more on that later.

I had to finish up some of the cleats that weren’t done earlier, and get that sole finished out. I get out there as soon as I can on weekdays in the morning, and work until SWMBO gets home, the neighbor wants to go fish at sunset, or some combination thereof. It makes the work get done, but at this point in the game, and in the season, I really want it done.

Here’s a shot of the forward seating area, with the tank in relatively the right location, where I am trying to figure out how I will run the hoses for the fill and fuel lines:

The tank, as drawn, only has 3″ of space from the tank top to the bottom of the forward seats. The filler neck eats up an inch and a half of that, so I am trying to scramble and find a way to get a filler neck thats a 90 degree angle. Not the fastest filler, but the space is at a premium.

At this point, I filleted, taped, and glassed the sole with biax, all in one shot (7 hrs) yesterday. Its not particularly easy due to heat, fumes, and hunger since there’s no time to stop, but it makes for a SOLID layup, all chemically bonded. Oh and I didn’t take intermittent photos. I wanted to be done moreso than a documentarian.

The interior post-glassing, note the size of the overlap, I am using full width fabric, which allowed a little more overlap in the most heavily walked on areas:

The tank, as drawn, only has 3″ of space from the tank top to the bottom of the forward seats. The filler neck eats up an inch and a half of that, so I am trying to scramble and find a way to get a filler neck thats a 90 degree angle. Not the fastest filler, but the space is at a premium.

At this point, I filleted, taped, and glassed the sole with biax, all in one shot (7 hrs) yesterday. Its not particularly easy due to heat, fumes, and hunger since there’s no time to stop, but it makes for a SOLID layup, all chemically bonded. Oh and I didn’t take intermittent photos. I wanted to be done moreso than a documentarian.

The interior post-glassing, note the size of the overlap, I am using full width fabric, which allowed a little more overlap in the most heavily walked on areas:

A shot from the side showing the trim up the sides and the fillets:

I realized the other day that I had no photos of the boat in its entirety since the flip. Let us fix that.

I drove all over hell and back today. Parts are accumulating, money is dwindling.

Turns out the tank I purchased wasn’t quite short enough. As designed the fuel tank filler doesn’t have enough room vertically, so it was time for a modification. More on that later.

First thing, I pre-coated all the surfaces in the two aft storage wells in front of the transom, then glued in the soles in those compartments. I have decided to go the bilge pump route in the furthest aft center compartment below the outboard splash well. It made sense because the benches drawn for the boat preclude using scuppers. No way to drain the water to where it notes, so we will go bilge. The sole in both aft compartments as well as the main sole can all drain easily into that space, then the water can be pumped over the transom. Easy peezee.

The soles of the wells, with the SHS (some heavy stuff) clamp:

So today was fuel tank day. The tank had the aforementioned affliction of not enough headroom, so it was time to get that handled. I have a shop here in the Spokane area that does great aluminum work, and is a local family biz, so I try to support them as much as possible ( Bill’s heliarc ). A few greenbacks and a couple hours later, we have a solution!

Perfect, that was ironed out. Next the vent tube was another vertical fitting, but a 90 degree elbow fixed that right up.

So on with the tank install. This will be slightly tutorial-esque.

I purchased Moeller’s tank strap kit, thinking it was straps. Nope, its metal tabs, which are smart, but a pain to build in place when you have a small space to work in. This will cause me to move the footwell bulkhead forward a couple inches, but that’t the joy of stitch and glue boat building, you get flexibility.

Here is the strap in question, one of four:

We are going to need to make stud mounts, which isn’t terribly difficult. Get the requisite hardware (in my case, 10/32 2″ machine screws, stainless steel, with matching nylon locking nuts), some epoxy, and an hour or two.

Take your scrap ply (9mm) and use the bracket for a pattern. Clamp all four together, throw them in the vise, and drill all of them out at once. Saves time, increases accuracy.

Now due to the shape of the boat, the aft hardware pads were able to be glued directly to the boat, but the forward pads required some angled feet. Take a little scrap mahogany 1×1, cut it to the appropriate angle, drill a small hole, and nail them together with an annular ring nail.

Once we have our pads and our feet, throw the screws in the pads, then use some double sided tape to stick the strap on the pad, with the screws in place. Place the tank in the correct position, making sure its level and square. Butter up a nice thick batch on the bottom of the hardware pad, and gently use the taped-on strap to locate the pad. Press down firmly to get the glue seated, squeezing out the sides. Once there, gently slide the plate away from the strap to give yourself some room to tighten down against once you put the tank in for final placement.

Repeat for the bow, but up front we have to glue the hardware pad to the angled spacer, so we have a good hull interface. Same technique for location.

Here is the finished product, glue smashed everywhere and the whole deal:

Once it cures up, remove the tank and get the pads ready for precoating. These won’t be seeing the light of day for a whole, hopefully a very LONG while:

Finally, I got started on rigging. The main filler tube can now go into what will be the port console, along with the vent tube and main fuel line. Keeping all these items on the port side allows all the steering, controls, and electrical components to run on the starboard, keeping the hot stuff away from the flammable stuff. Safety first!

Here is the hole, and location I chose:

We left off with the tank install, so naturally the next thing to do is get the consoles cut out and prepped for install. The gaps for the plumbing for the tank and the forthcoming controls needed to be ironed out asap.

Here are the consoles cut out and propped into place:

I made small locators out of doug fir that I had laying around, cut to the appropriate length, then screwed to the loose panel. Here is another handly little tidbit for the loyal readers. Sometimes you need the part to stay right where you tell it to, immediately. This is where you go in the house, dig into SWMBO’s stuff, and steal her hot glue gun (or if your lucky, she has two, as in my case).

Very convenient and has plenty of holding power.

Here are the two consoles, with the fillets in place, and some woven tape laid down on the joints. My hands weren’t sticky, so I took a photo:

Following those getting glassed, I finalled the tank install, with a tidy little wire job, then ran them through the bulkhead:

All is ready for the next big project, adding the bow seats. Previously we saw the cleats glued to the hull sides. This was a drop in install with butt blocks just like the sole:

A gracious Shayne stopped by one morning after work, for a trade. In exchange for taking his daughter Madison out on the lake, who was an astonishingly quick-to-learn rower, he helped me hang the motor which just returned from the local dealer. It took a rope and pulley system, along with some brute strength, to get it in the right spot.

After hanging the motor, it appears as though I may have to add some elevation to the top of the transom. I am having my cavitation plate appear to be 2″ below the bottom of the boat. Thats a little too much drag. Still have to check the particulars on it, trim angles, etc, but thats how it looks now.

Next up, the decks needed to be added. The boat stiffened up some with the rubrails, considerably more with the gunnel cleat, and absolutely became bulletproof with the addition of the decks.

Bow deck being glued up:

First off, I need to once again apologize to anyone driving through the neighborhood, on the lake, or neighbors within earshot. I tried to figure out every word that either ended in K, made reference to a part of the body, or in some way called attention to a bodily function or blaspheming.

While gluing up the bow deck, the section at the very point came into question. The butt block was 1/4″ too wide. AAHHH!~ Soaked in glue, I had to remove it, cut it, reattach it, then commit to swaring, throwing tools, and breaking things. Nothing went well, and the bow looks like it. Thank you filler, thank you. You will make it all go away…..

This little tyraid was chased the next day by putting the side decks on. I am running extremely low on filler, and low on epoxy as well. so its going slowly. I have small amounts of glue laying things up, plenty strong enough, but the fillets need filling.

The decks, from the position of the F frame:

So now its like 95 degrees in the garage, the wife comes home, the neighbors want to go out on the lake in their boat. I think I have about 15 minutes. There has to be some project I can squeeze in…

Footwell it is! With feet to test it. This seating area is surprisingly comfortable, and I think it’ll get more use than most anywhere else.

Then, after the tour and taking the neighbor kids wakeboarding, then another set of neighbors wanted to go on a fireworks cruise at dark, I came back out to close up the garage. Which led me to taking off the clamps, then removing all the screws I had used as clamps. Then SWMBO came out, so I called it a night, shot a couple more photos, and passed out.

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